Giving Your Product Release a Name

uniRow SeabiscuitWe recently released the next version of uniRow – which we have named Seabiscuit.

The name was perfect for this release for the following reasons:

  1. This version is a quantum jump in performance, design and experience from the previous version.
  2. We are a small team working hard to deliver top quality results.
  3. We wanted the name to represent passion, endurance and an ability to surprise.
  4. There is competition in our market and that makes us run faster.

Seabiscuit (May 23, 1933 – May 17, 1947) was a champion Thoroughbred racehorse in the United States. A small horse, Seabiscuit had an inauspicious start to his racing career, but became an unlikely champion and a symbol of hope to many Americans during theGreat Depression. Seabiscuit was the subject of a 1949 film, The Story of Seabiscuit; a 2001 book, Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand; and a 2003 film, Seabiscuit, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Give your product an amazing name, here are some reasons why you should.

  1. You have worked hard on it, show it off – within reasonable limits of course.
  2. Google uses Desserts to name Android versions, Apple names Mac OS versions after the big cats. Give your product a character.
  3. You are building a company along with the product, let the name represent what your company stands for.
  4. Be a trend-setter. There is a fair chance that other companies in your sector are running down numbered versions, do something refreshing.

Your product is your baby, give it a name. Don’t name it with a number. Well, unless you are George Costanza!

The curious case of Facebook Video Calling

FB Video Calling Application LogoFacebook recently launched Video Calling (only one-to-one) in partnership with Skype at http://www.facebook.com/videocalling. Yes, you guessed it right! This was the page URL of our fast growing Video Calling application that Facebook disabled, without any explanation ofcourse, on April 7th. Clearly this had nothing to do with any policy violation. Facebook wanted the URL for itself and went ahead and disabled an application demonstrating its one-upmanship attitude in dealing with situations.

When we tried to understand the reasons for this action, a generic email was sent which basically read this:

This app pre-fills user´s message and this is not allowed according to our Policies (point IV.2): “You must not pre-fill any of the fields associated with the following products, unless the user manually generated the content earlier in the workflow: Stream stories (user_message parameter for Facebook.streamPublish and FB.Connect.streamPublish, and message parameter for stream.publish), Photos (caption), Videos (description), Notes (title and content), Links (comment), and Jabber/XMPP.

We recommend you to fix this and re-launch again the app. Also, in order to avoid bad user´s feedback, we recommend you to monitor user reports and be sure to comply with all Facebook Principles and Policies (http://developers.facebook.com/policy/).

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